I urge you to read...

A book that will make you think and laugh and that will become and instantaneous favorite. You won't believe it, you would have heard bad press about it. You may think you need other books to understand it, or other commentaries on it. They may discourage you, or you may yell at me (please do if you think I'm crazy, but don't ignore the recommendation or you'll be sorry). You may believe it's over your abilities... But you are WRONG. There is a way you can read this book without having to analyze it or understand all the ramifications. It is written in a style that is not cultivated anymore, but the language is at your capacity, I'm sure.I've read heavier weight books and I was always intimidated by this one without a reason. This book shouldn't be condemned as a book for an elite, but it should be in the most read lists, if we could see beyond our noses of the 'new', flashy and most of the times trashy.

I'm envisioning a new force of mommas and housewives avidly reading:






PLATO,

The Republic,

Yes, give it a try. I was laughing hard with Thrasymachos talking to Socrates. It's written in a dialogue form, very dynamic, fun and catchy. And if you don't have a copy of it, you may get one for some cents or FREE HERE. Believe me.



6 opinion(s):

Charlotte Mason in the City said...

Really?!

Okay, I'm taking your advice. I'm currently on a mission to read the books I own (and then get rid of them...I'm over-run with books!), but I will put this on my list of books to read after I finish my stack. I'm up for it!

Silvia said...

Trust me on this one. You'll enjoy the dialogue format much, it's like a conversation with different and interesting people, and you'll like Socrates, I do, his questioning is very sharp.
When I read Great Expectations, I laughed hard at some moments, but I totally never expected to be laughing at the exchange between Thrasymachos and Socrates. I'm not a native English speaker or reader, and I find Shakespeare more challenging than Plato. I need to start with Lamb before. I'm glad that you are determined to go through your pile, but why do you need to get rid of the books after? Or at least the not so good, but then why do you want to read not so good books? You can always turn them for credit for more books, ha ha ha.

Silvia said...

I mean that I have NOT READ SHAKESPEARE because that's truly difficult to me and I found The Republic to be more approachable than I expected it to be.

Jeanne said...

Hmmmmm. Okay. I'll get it on my Kindle for a rainy day...

I do trust you Silvia...

Funny, you say...

Kelly said...

I have the Republic but I've never read it. Last year after we read Plutarch's life of Dion, in which Plato figures largely, we decided to read his "Seventh Letter" which he wrote to Dion's family to explain the circumstances of his death. That part of it is sad, but the letter was delightful so full of wisdom, good humor, and kindness.

Silvia said...

Jeanne, Kelly, I'm SURE you both will enjoy The Republic. I can't wait to get cozy and read more of it every day, though I am in no rush, I want and will stay long with Socrates and my new friends.

Where I'm at, Thrasymachos throws his definition of being just and he is about to leave when Socrates says, OH, NO, YOU CAN'T SURELY leave this to us and not to defend it, can you? Of course justice is not as easy as the advantage of the strongest. Socrates refuses to accept those who govern justly do it for their advantage. It's funny that he says those more ready and able are those who are less interested in accepting power, and since they do it for the good of others, not for their advantage, they sometimes have to be lured into the position with the prospect of earning a salary, since ruling justly is not a "profitable practice".
Justice and being just in book 1 is related to what makes a just ruler or man of power.

 

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