The World Seem Quieter then...

Enjoy some Caldecott Art
Nancy spoiled me and sent me a booklet of In Review, no longer in print, the one titled Art: Truth and Beauty.

Right after the foreword there are three excerpts from Maurice Sendak, Catherine Doherty, and, no surprise, Charlotte Mason.

I will talk about the very first one by Sendak. I quote:
Maurice Sendak was asked this question: "Do you think that children's book publishing is significantly different today than it was when you began in the early fifties?" He answered by saying: "Well, yes, of course, it's very different. For one thing the world seemed quieter then, and there was more opportunity to do experimental kinds of books. If you're an artist, you must have time to grow slowly and not feel pushed. It was that way in the early fifties. One could develop gradually. Now, of course, publishing is much more competitive, and we do many more books, but not many more good books. Something is lost. There is a rush, we are flooded with books, books come pouring out of the publishing meat grinder. And the quality has dropped severely. We may be able to print a book better, but are the books being published worth printing? We have a backlist of books, superb books, by Margaret Wise Brown, by Ruth Krauss, by lots of people. I'd much rather we just took a year off, maybe two-just stop publishing. and get those old books back, let the children have them! Books don't go out of fashion with children. They just go out of fashion with adults and publishers.
And I got to thinking that maybe we could extrapolate this to our homeschooling and our kids childhood. I am going to try and see if it works:

"Do you think that homeschooling is significantly different today than it was when it began in the early fifties?" I will answer by saying: "Well, yes, of course, it's very different. For one thing the world seemed quieter then, and there was more opportunity to homeschool the way it felt right for your family. If you're a child, you must have time to grow slowly and not feel pushed. It was that way in the early fifties. A child could develop gradually. Now, of course, homeschooling is much more competitive, and we do many more activities, but not many more good practices. Something is lost. There is a rush, we are flooded with new methods, activities come pouring out of the blogger meat grinder. And the quality has dropped severely. We may be able to blog about something better, but are the principles and posts being published worth following? We have a backlist of books, proven principles, by Charlotte Mason and others, innumerable living books that incite ideas. I'd much rather we just took a year off, maybe two-just stop doing without reflecting and get those old teaching principles back, let the children have them! Good teaching and ideas don't go out of fashion with children. They just go out of fashion with adults and publishers.




5 opinion(s):

Pam... said...

Excellent and thought provoking Silvia. I loved the way you compared it with homeschooling too. I just have to think that though, in Charlotte's schools many many subjects were being taught, I think there was a quiet and lack of hurry in the atmosphere. I don't think the children felt pushed, or that anything was lost. That's the amazing key to her method. Depth and quality; but not waste, busyness, or rush. It has to be a core principle of hers and of ours also.
One thing, could you share from the other two excepts sometime two?

Pam... said...

oops, multitasking....The last sentence was suppose to say, "Could you share from the two other excerpts also?"

Silvia said...

Pam, your last sentence made me feel a bit better about all the typos in my posts, even though I supposedly revise them.

Didn't this make you think about what Brandy wrote about The Kingdom of Noise?

Yes, I am sure in CM schools there was not this kingdom of noise, as I know many of us work hard not to let it take over our homeschools, or in one word, over our life.

Pam... said...

Yes, it is like what Brandy wrote about. She always finds the best jewels as she digs in.
And yes, noise, rushing, being driven, endlessly craving more.....this is where we fail to see and fail to hear the eternal voice. The eucharisteo is lost when the precious things 'in our midst' are trodden over and missed.

Pam... said...

Excellent and thought provoking Silvia. I loved the way you compared it with homeschooling too. I just have to think that though, in Charlotte's schools many many subjects were being taught, I think there was a quiet and lack of hurry in the atmosphere. I don't think the children felt pushed, or that anything was lost. That's the amazing key to her method. Depth and quality; but not waste, busyness, or rush. It has to be a core principle of hers and of ours also.
One thing, could you share from the other two excepts sometime two?

 

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