Do you DIGEST your books?

With books, to use the always inspiring food analogy, one can devour junk, or have a diet of whole books. But it is not only WHAT you eat/read, but HOW you eat/read it.

My friend Heather, in a SMART AND FULL OF WISDOM post, describes how she has been reading herself, and how she has led her daughter into the same type of reading that I also believe to be in sync with how Charlotte Mason conceived this matter.

It wasn't long after we met that I knew I had found a kindred spirit in Heather, a person with whom to share so much about books and life. I led Heather to some books, and she led me to a new way of reading. I led Heather to some ideas, she showed me how to fully embrace them.

At the time of her first post about reading, I followed her advice and started to read Great Expectations. It also took me several months, and I had been wanting to read Dickens and never did until then. What a pleasant experience, as she writes. I LIVED in London and in Pip's village for a good while, the not so thrilling ending of the book was so insignificant with the fact that I had gained so much during the time in which I was close to all of the characters, as an invisible observer inside the rooms that Dickens describes with such a passion.

In our lately readings with the girls we have said farewell to Stuart, (from E.B White Stuart Little), which we enjoyed in almost two months, and we have been pretty faithful in our readings of the Scriptures and of the Grimm brother tales, but I never quite wrapped everything as Heather has. I am preparing for AO year 1, when we will read like this, but it never occurred to me we could do it with our own list of 10 books or so starting NOW.

I tell you that it took me FIVE MINUTES to pick ten books I know the girls will love. I plan to do more focused on my oldest reading in the morning, and one that both will enjoy in the evenings. Give me six months (I know it is a long time, but it will come), and I surely will tell you how we are in this endeavor to delve and DIGEST our book feast. And, of course, we will continue enjoying our picture books, nursery rhymes, and old time favorites! And voila...this is my list:

MONDAY: Grimm in Spanish in the morning, Milly Molly Mandy in the evenings.
TUESDAY: The Miraculous New Home Journey of Edward Tulane in the morning, A Big Treasury of Little Animals in the evening.
WEDNESDAY: The Japanese twins in the Morning. No reading in the evenings due to Bible class.
THURSDAY: Stories of Great Americans...Engleton in the morning. World's Greatest Fairy Tales in the evening.
FRIDAY: Chester Cricket's New Home in the morning. Peter Rabbit in the evening.
SATURDAY: Winnie the Pooh (sometime in the day).
This list has been added to my LESSON PLANS 2011 at Resources by Silvia.


7 opinion(s):

Books For Breakfast said...

Silvia,
Thank you for your kind words. We too are blessed to have found you and your girls. I so look forward to our Tuesday meetings. Just a note on Chester Cricket, you might want to locate a copy of Cricket In Time Square to read first, being the first book in the series. You should be able to find a copy at KBB. I might try to get over there today, and I'll pick it up if I find it. Love you guys!

Silvia said...

Your welcome, Heather. I left you a comment on your blog about the books.
It was so obvious and I didn't see it. Having a schedule of just ten books a week (which may sound a lot but it is just a chapter, not long at all), sets up a nice pace.
Today our day went FABULOUS. My oldest dictated me in half an hour a wonderful story she entitled Elf's way back home, that I wrote in the pages she had beautifully illustrated.
We sketched, did just a bit of math...I tend to forget that SHORT part of the SHORT LESSONS, ha ha ha.
Thanks for being such an inspiration to us.
We love you dearly!

Nancy said...

Silvia,
How wonderful for your family that you are applying and trying to understand all this BEFORE your children are even in 1st grade. It makes a difference to them when mom is learning, too. It makes for a flowing stream and not a stagnant pool!

Loved your Great Expectations example - perfect!

Ring true,
Nancy

Ellen said...

Sivia, wonderful post! I have to add my thumbs up for Cricket in Times Square. We also loved The Trumpet of the Swan. I see you are reading The Miraculous Journey of Edward Tulane. That is a fantastic book, but there are several sad parts (a sick and neglected by her drunkard father -- abused -- little girl who dies is one example). Tiny Girl was in second grade and Miss Priss in third when we first read it. We got teary over parts, but we LOVED it and have since read it aloud again.

Silvia said...

Nancy, you hit the nail, sharp as usual. One of the most forgotten and neglected principles among homeschoolers (not just CM inspired ones) is that of the learning of the mother. Although I know YOU and others at the Educating Mother (http://educatingmother.wordpress.com/) do have it very present. Than you hear many who complain or are constantly going from this curriculum to another because they are failing to see this. How do you expect your children to learn when you are not learning yourself and inspiring them as a natural consequence?
And the knowing this before they are even in the first grade...ahem...I´m just and old mom of young children, ha ha ha. It is how life has been with me! I can´t complain. It has advantages and inconveniences, I guess you just pointed to one.
And Nancy, now I´m enjoying Sherlock Holmes in ENGLISH! Hooray! I am also getting ready for Shakespeare (via Lamb, of course), and delighting in a Beautiful Girlhood the original plus Oliver Twist (I am following Heather footsteps), and I also have Middlemarch in mind thanks to her.
She just told me that she could camp in the nineteen hundreds per life! ha ha ha.

Ellen: oh, we have not started any of those two yet, but it may be over my 6 year old girl´s head...no problem for the 10 book plan, in other three minutes I can find a replacement! ha ha ha. (I am taking note of The Trumpet of the Swan). And a minute of advertisement, in case you need a book list, stop by Sage Parnassus, if you haven´t done it yet.

Nancy said...

Silvia,
How wonderful for your family that you are applying and trying to understand all this BEFORE your children are even in 1st grade. It makes a difference to them when mom is learning, too. It makes for a flowing stream and not a stagnant pool!

Loved your Great Expectations example - perfect!

Ring true,
Nancy

Silvia said...

Nancy, you hit the nail, sharp as usual. One of the most forgotten and neglected principles among homeschoolers (not just CM inspired ones) is that of the learning of the mother. Although I know YOU and others at the Educating Mother (http://educatingmother.wordpress.com/) do have it very present. Than you hear many who complain or are constantly going from this curriculum to another because they are failing to see this. How do you expect your children to learn when you are not learning yourself and inspiring them as a natural consequence?
And the knowing this before they are even in the first grade...ahem...I´m just and old mom of young children, ha ha ha. It is how life has been with me! I can´t complain. It has advantages and inconveniences, I guess you just pointed to one.
And Nancy, now I´m enjoying Sherlock Holmes in ENGLISH! Hooray! I am also getting ready for Shakespeare (via Lamb, of course), and delighting in a Beautiful Girlhood the original plus Oliver Twist (I am following Heather footsteps), and I also have Middlemarch in mind thanks to her.
She just told me that she could camp in the nineteen hundreds per life! ha ha ha.

Ellen: oh, we have not started any of those two yet, but it may be over my 6 year old girl´s head...no problem for the 10 book plan, in other three minutes I can find a replacement! ha ha ha. (I am taking note of The Trumpet of the Swan). And a minute of advertisement, in case you need a book list, stop by Sage Parnassus, if you haven´t done it yet.

 

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