Mundains and The Great Gatsby

We are anticipating my sister's visit this coming Saturday. She'll be with us for just one week, so if you don't see much of us that's the reason why.
Mundains...we are mundains, as the telepaths call us. Telepaths are 'like humans' but they've been created superior. They can read minds and many other wonders according to their range (P12 is the maximum strength and ability) and the training they receive in their world. I watch this old series called Babylon 5 with my husband, one episode every now and then, and I bond with him. We now have a vocabulary borrowed from the series we like using between us. The writer of the show is a philosophy major, and sometimes we witness this in the philosophical conversations and topics offered in the show.



The Great Gatsby is my next novel to read. It's in Mortimer Adler's books to be read in your life, and its brevity has an extra appeal (to give my mind a time affordable break). As I'm reading the introductory notes that I felt for reading this time, I came by this paragraph:

"Fitgerald's carelessness about facts and empirical knowledge is well known: he frequently wrote about France when his knowledge of French was poor; his spelling (in French and English) was execrable. In Gatsby he touches on subjects (notably, the doings on Wall Street) about which he knew little and imagined a good deal. His fiction tends to circumvent these problems by selecting significant realistic detail rather than accumulating a mass of facts. As a record of a particular time and place, the novel is focused, selective and distilled: a historical concentrate." (Guy Reynolds, Rutherford College, University of Kent at Canterbury)."
And I conclude that a prestigious writer got away with execrable spelling (you've got to love that word, it's exactly the same in Spanish :-) And if that's not remarkable enough, he also managed to make it to posterity with a poor knowledge of history. Now I'm laughing at our paranoia about not covering enough ground (that's specifically for my Bluestocking Belle friend). And he just pulled it all together in a style they describe as HISTORICAL CONCENTRATE. How ironic, do you see yourself telling your children "I'm going to introduce you to lesson #7, how to survive in life with the spelling that you have managed to amass for yourselves, weather impeccable or execrable, and as for your history or literary knowledge, you'll also learn to shoot for the CONCENTRATE, it's not good for juice but it's good for academics".


Unfortunately (or fortunately) for the Lord and your duties as christians, there are no loops or shortcuts. Nothing less than a pure heart, and a WHOLESOME understanding and discerning of His Word.
And what is easier to accomplish, academic success or spiritual development ? I want to think that the question is irrelevant, whether hard or easy the second goal is the only one that matters, and I'm always convinced that if we aim for it, the first will come, somehow, some day, even if from CONCENTRATE but most likely not from concentrate but from a meaningful and steady diet.



5 opinion(s):

No Ordinary Me said...

I think that it is harder, yet the most fullfulling is the development of our spiritual walk. Our hearts (souls) are harder to work out than the most difficult trig problem.

Oh, but very rewarding and worth the hard work of pouring out our hearts, digging in the word, applying the word, listening to God and His Will, sacrificing things (that are usually meaningless), circumsing our hearts, training our hearts and minds, and praising the Lord.

Silvia said...

No Ordinary Me: I agree, it's harder, but by far the most rewarding, and the one worth all the efforts.

Ellen said...

Great post (and thanks for the shout out!). I suppose I'd rather aim for a broad understanding instead of a concentrated (lack of, as Reynolds points out in Fitzgerald's case) understanding. AS to academic/spiritual pursuits, the former has come far more easily to me, but I more highly esteem the latter. I'll be interested to hear what you think of Gatsby!

Ellen said...

Great post (and thanks for the shout out!). I suppose I'd rather aim for a broad understanding instead of a concentrated (lack of, as Reynolds points out in Fitzgerald's case) understanding. AS to academic/spiritual pursuits, the former has come far more easily to me, but I more highly esteem the latter. I'll be interested to hear what you think of Gatsby!

No Ordinary Me said...

I think that it is harder, yet the most fullfulling is the development of our spiritual walk. Our hearts (souls) are harder to work out than the most difficult trig problem.

Oh, but very rewarding and worth the hard work of pouring out our hearts, digging in the word, applying the word, listening to God and His Will, sacrificing things (that are usually meaningless), circumsing our hearts, training our hearts and minds, and praising the Lord.

 

Contact Form

Name

Email *

Message *

Amazon Affiliates

Search Engine

Search/Labels